Journey of Dreams • Photography by Fabrizio Tessaro

Winter in The Canadian Rockies: Talbot Lake, Jasper National Park – Day One

Despite the cold, wind, frozen toes, frozen fingers and dripping snotty noses, I love photographing our Rocky Mountains in winter.  When it’s minus 25 degrees Celsius  and gusting winds are blowing it can be down right miserable and simply put….darn cold!  I was fortunate enough this past January to spend two pleasant mornings making images on frozen Talbot Lake in Jasper National Park.  Even though it was plus 2 degrees Celsius, the winds were blowing  making it difficult to capture sharp images.  The winds were so fierce that without proper placement, camera and tripod would slide across the ice surface at great speeds.  My vivid flashback of my tripod ice spikes hit hard as I shook my head to the fact that they were 368km away sitting right where I had left them on my kitchen counter. Make the best of it I say!

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, Talbot Lake

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, Talbot Lake

Talbot Lake and The Miette Range : Prints Available – Nikon D3S, Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8,  .8 sec @ f/22, ISO 100, Singh Ray 3 Stop Soft Edge Graduated ND,  Singh Ray LB Polarizer, Manfrotto Tripod

 

While the high altitude of the mountain ski slopes had accumulated plenty of snow this year, this was not the case at the lower elevations in the park. Talbot Lake lies on what I call a wind belt in Jasper National Park. It is common to experience high gusts in this area and when these gusts are combined with such low snow accumulation, the frozen surface of Talbot Lake is left clean and polished where cracks, bubbles, grasses and stumps make for interesting foregrounds.

 

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, Talbot Lake

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, Talbot Lake

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, Talbot Lake

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, Talbot Lake

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, Talbot Lake

Similar conditions were met in the afternoon on Jasper Lake situated on the north side of highway 16 and just west of Lake Talbot. The clouds were setting in creating additional atmosphere for some winter scenics with the De Smet Mountain Range in the background.

 

Jasper Lake and The De Smet Range, Jasper National Park

Jasper Lake and The De Smet Range, Jasper National Park

Jasper Lake and The De Smet Range, Jasper National park

Thanks for visiting.

Until next time…

F

4 Thoughts on “Winter in The Canadian Rockies: Talbot Lake, Jasper National Park – Day One

  1. Gord Neufeld on April 8, 2012 at 9:36 AM said:

    Once again fantastic work! My favorites you ask? Hmmm…tough to narrow it done however if I had to choose I would pick the Talbot Lake Frozen Ice Details. It looks like granite with mystery attached to it. The print would look great in large size. I also enjoy all the prints with the wind swept foregrounds not to mention if you want to win my heart just shoot everything in monochrome.

    I imagine that as a photographer it is a requirement, and a challange, to be able to recognize oppurtunity and then capitalize on it. Shooting some pictures while your camera and tripod was sliding, wind blowen, across the ice could have made for some fantastic effects. However the potential expense connected with that shot may not be justified. :)

    Nice work!
    Gord

    • Hi Gord, As always, your thoughts are appreciated. Thanks for sharing! Regarding your idea on a camera/tripod sliding image…I did give it a few tries. :-) I probably could have zoomed in to remove some of that negative space but with a little “extreme” slider adjustments in lightroom I was able to add a little texture. I’m not sure if this image does anything for me though…

      Wind Swept Tripod

      Thanks again…
      Cheers!

  2. Gord Neufeld on April 8, 2012 at 3:58 PM said:

    I think the sliding camera shot is great, good job capitalizing on the moment. The colors are nice, it has an oil painting feel to it. Looks like you had the velocity dialed in perfectly.

    • Thanks Gord! There’s nothing like chasing your camera with tripod and cable release across a frozen lake! :-p The more I look at it…the more I’m beginning to like it. Perhaps it’s a little over saturated but I wanted to really push the processing here. I didn’t actually think of processing this until you made mention of it in your comment.
      Cheers!

Please feel free to share your thoughts.

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